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Read the Introduction here.

REVIEW #1

TITLE

 What to do Before, During and After a Flood
 

AUTHORITY 

Australian Government.  Attorney-General’s Department. Emergency Management Australia.
 

WHAT'S GREAT ABOUT THIS RESOURCE

1. It uses simple language and a clear, easy to read layout. 
2. It covers a realistic range of topics that affected homeowners and property owners will need.
3. It has some simple, clearly listed things-to-do in preparation for a flood coming.

 

CONTENTS AND/OR SUMMARY

Chapters 1 and 2 cover what to do before and during a flood.  The information is sound and easy to read and follow.  It is not detailed here as we are concentrating on the renovations after-the-fact in this document.

Chapter 3 covers what to do after the flood has occurred and includes the following topics :

- Hazards on entering your home (including the Electrical Distribution System, Drinking Water, Food, Hygiene)

- Clean/salvage – household items (including Insurance Claims, Bedding, Clothing, Household, Linens and Woollens, Floor Coverings, Furniture, Leather, Refrigerators and Freezers, TV/Radio Sets, Hot Water Systems, Valuable Books and Papers)

- Repair – flood-damaged buildings (“The main considerations are to dry the building materials and furnishings out as soon as possible, and to delay renovation and redecoration for as long as possible, at least until building components are substantially dry.”)

- Cleaning/restoring walls, floors, etc ( including Brickwork and Concrete Blockwork, Wall Cavities, Sub-floor space, Floors, Heating Ducts, Stains, Mould, Brickwork, Joinery, Particle Board, Plaster Sheet.

 

LINK 

http://www.bom.gov.au/water/floods/document/What_todo_floods.pdf 

If the link doesn’t work go to http://www.bom.gov.au > search on “what to do” > the article is third from the top
 

 

REVIEW #2

TITLE

 What’s All The Fuss About Mould Lately?
 

AUTHORITY 

Mycologia Pty Ltd (One of Australia’s Leading Environmental Consultancies & Laboratories specialising in environmental Mycology. Mycologia’s core business is in providing indoor air quality and mould investigation services).

 

WHAT'S GREAT ABOUT THIS RESOURCE

1. It is written by knowledgeable experts in the field, but is easy to read and follow.
2. A great deal of scaremongering and hype has gradually been built up about mould in buildings and associated health aspects.  Mould may be hazardous, but not necessarily quite as bad as made out in some publications.  This article addresses the issue sensibly and explains how to deal with mould.

 

CONTENTS AND/OR SUMMARY

The following are some random extracts from the document, indicating the type of discussion covered :

“The "new" awareness of mould in the 1990’s saw what can only be described as the unfortunate but "Great Mould Rush". To date, this has mostly occurred overseas. However, some mould issues have attempted to land on our shores.”

“Yes there is mould that can cause adverse health effects, and there is mould that can damage your house and grow to monstrous size. Similarly, there are real dangers to people’s health from mould exposure in particular the very young and the Aged, allergy sufferers and those with compromised immune systems. Unfortunately, most of this recent scare-hype is built on unproven myths that need to be dispelled with scientific evidence. “

 “The lack of clarity in our scientific knowledge about indoor mould ecology is causing serious difficulties for our medical, legal and insurance institutions. This has lead to situations where a single spore of certain species can close a school or building, through to complete disregard for mould and even medical professionals declaring that mould does not cause health problems.”

“The only reliable means to identify mould species is to perform traditional mycological differentiation on nutrient agar. This requires years of training and practice to get to a point where you might start to become comfortable with identifying the thousands of the environmental mould species that exist. “

“The only proven way to deal with mould is to find the source of the moisture feeding it, fix it, dry it out, physically remove the mould and then apply chemicals, but only in the right dilutions or they won’t work. The most effective chemical solution that we have against mould so far is our favourite salad dressing - vinegar. This is claimed it to be the most effective because it actually kills mould, but doesn’t introduce a new chemical pollutant into the indoor air. Vinegar is even used by some European hospitals as one of their main disinfectants. A point of note is that only white fermented vinegar seems to work, as synthetic acetic acid does not appear to be effective.”

Our Note :  Read this article for information on mould, rather than reading information that the general media provides.

LINK 

Click here to go to What's all the Fuss about Mould Lately?

If the link doesn’t work go to http://www.mould.com.au > search on “what’s all the fuss” > the article will be at the top



REVIEW #3

TITLE

DISASTER RECOVERY INFORMATION . CLEANING CHECKLIST . . . a tool for contractors and homeowners to use after a flood or disaster
 

AUTHORITY 

Building Services Authority (BSA) Queensland

 

WHAT'S GREAT ABOUT THIS RESOURCE

1. It’s in simple checklist format – no lengthy paragraphs.
2. It covers all types of building and construction materials that may be used in houses and need cleaning after a flood/disaster.
3. Incorporated in the checklist is the cleaning method and tools required.

 

 

 

CONTENTS AND/OR SUMMARY

This checklist for cleaning covers :

Timber wall studs
Concrete floors
Metal surfaces
Brick or concrete block
Gyprock or plasterboard
Fibre cement sheeting
Chipboard or particle board products
Ceramic tiles
Timber floors and sealed/polished timber
Split system air conditioners
Fixtures and fittings (chipboard and particleboard)

LINK 

Click here to go to Cleaning Checklist

If the link doesn’t work go to 
http://www.bsadisasterrecovery.qld.gov.au > Homeowners > Cleaning Checklist 


REVIEW #4

TITLE

 Guide to Assessment and Repair of Flood Damaged Timber and Timber Framed Houses
 

AUTHORITY 

Timber Queensland
 

WHAT'S GREAT ABOUT THIS RESOURCE

1. This covers in considerable detail the different types of timbers and timber structures found in houses. 
2. The guide contains photographs to explain and clarify some points, and has been recently updated to ensure relevance to recent events.
3. Gives an indication of actual drying times for materials, rather than just saying ‘allow to dry thoroughly’ as other information tends to.

 

CONTENTS AND/OR SUMMARY

This is an 8 page Timber Queensland Technical Guide.   The Guide covers the topics below and describes how to assess the extent of damage and how repairs should be approached.

 ASSESSMENT OF DAMAGE 

Notes some important timber and timber related issues to consider when assessing structural damage.

TIMBER AND MOISTURE

Mould and Decay

Swelling and shrinkage

KITCHEN CUPBOARDS, VANITY UNITS, LAUNDRY UNITS etc

ROOFS, WALLS AND FLOORS

LAMINATED BEAMS, LVL, ‘I’-BEAMS AND STRUCTURAL PLYWOOD

TIMBER FLOORS AND TIMBER DECKS

Solid Tongue & Groove (T&G) strip floors direct to joists on bearers

Plywood floors on joists and bearers

Particleboard (‘chipboard’) floors on joists and bearers

Timber floors on concrete slabs (includes, overlay, T&G on ply or battens, direct fix etc)

T&G, overlay or floating floors on plywood or particle board on joists

 Wet area (bathrooms, laundries etc) floors laid over T&G, plywood or particleboard subfloors on joists

Timber Decks

TERMITE MANAGEMENT

Traditional Queensland highsets and lightweight timber homes with suspended floors on stumps

Single or two storey houses on slabs or where houses have been built in under on a slab

         Termite treated framing

LINK 

Click here to go to Guide to Assessment and Repair of Flood Damaged Timber and Timber Framed Houses

If the link doesn’t work go to http://www.bsa.qld.gov.au > on the home page scroll down to the heading “Guide to Assessment and Repair of Flood Damaged Timber and Timber Framed Houses” and find the ‘click here’ link.




REVIEW #5

TITLE

 “Guidelines for Working on Flood Damaged Premises
 

AUTHORITY 

Master Builders Association (MBA)
 

WHAT'S GREAT ABOUT THIS RESOURCE

1. It’s actually complied for builders, so if you’re having a builder do your repair work, you can ‘talk’ through these points with them and have some understanding and visibility of what’s happening, when you might otherwise not have.  A good thing to avoid being ‘taken advantage of’.
2. It’s a very legible checklist in order of importance.
3. It covers the area of Contracts to some degree, and indicates that due to the likelihood of urgency to commence repairs, the builder may require the customer to waive the cooling off period.

 

 

 

 

CONTENTS AND/OR SUMMARY

When performing repair work on flood damaged buildings, there are some guidelines that builders  should follow. The factsheet at this link is prepared for builders by the MBA and includes an inspection checklist and information on contracts and interim measures for homes while repair work is completed.  It also guides the builder as to how the required work should be quoted.

The contents are :
Checklist
  1. The first priorities in flood repair situations are power and plumbing
  2. Photograph & record the condition of the damaged building work before undertaking any repairs.
  3. Remove all mud, dirt and silt prior to rectification.
  4. Specific areas of the home to be inspected include:
       • Wall sheeting/plasterboard/other wall sheeting
       • Wet area sheeting
       • Skirting, architraves
       • Wardrobe doors and
       • Kitchen cupboards, vanity units and laundry
       • Timber floors
       • Blanket/bulk insulation
       • Bathrooms
       • Concrete paths and driveways
       • Painting
       • Termite
       • Floor tiles
       • Trapped water
Interim measures 
Contracts
  The following contract documents are referenced :
       RBC-1 – Residential Building Contract
       MWC-1 Minor Works Contract and TC-H Trade Contract Housing
       Domesti c Building Contracts Act 2000.
       Queensland Building Services Authority Act 1991.
  The site also provides a copy of the Waiver Notice Under a Repair Contract
Useful links and information
The site references the Building Services Association (BSA) Disaster Recovery website :  www.bsadisasterrecovery.qld.gov.au.

LINK 

Click here to go to Guidelines for Working on Flood Damaged Premises

If the link doesn’t work go to http://www.masterbuilders.asn.au > search on “flood” > select Guidelines for Working on Flood Damaged Premises >  download the .pdf file



REVIEW #6

TITLE

 BSA Tips for Rebuilding After a Disaster
 

AUTHORITY 

Building Services Authority (BSA) Queensland
 

WHAT'S GREAT ABOUT THIS RESOURCE

1. In simple checklist format. 
2. Explains what to do whether insured or not.
3. Explains how to approach a contract and how to undertake the project.

 

CONTENTS AND/OR SUMMARY

Explains the process of building repairs from the disaster event to building work completed and inspection stage – and what to do if problems arise.  It guides the homeowner to get 3 written quotes from BSA licensed builders or trade contractors AND to check their license and to beware of certain inappropriate practices.

The contents areas are :
 1. Major damage
 2. Determine what needs to be done (Insured or Uninsured)
 3. Obtain quotes
 4. Check licence details before you engage a builder or trade contractor (a FREE service)
 5. Use a written contract
 6. Seek legal advice
 7. Progress payments
 8. Building inspections
 9. Queensland Home Warranty Scheme
 10. If problems arise
Further Information

LINK 

Click here to go to BSA Tips for Rebuilding After a Disaster

If the link doesn’t work go to to http://bsadisasterrecovery.qld.gov.au > Homeowners > Disasters > Natural Disasters - BSA's Tips for Rebuilding
 



REVIEW #7

TITLE

 BSA Homeowner Guide to Rebuilding After a Flood
 

AUTHORITY 

Building Services Authority (BSA) Queensland
 

WHAT'S GREAT ABOUT THIS RESOURCE

1. It’s been updated for the recent flood season – dated January 2011. 
2. Gives details on how to recover lost documents, such as birth certificates, property titles etc.
3. It gives an excellent ‘quick guide’ to home restoration – allowing the reader to scan across the columns to determine short term and possible long term solutions to a problem or homeowner concern about their house.

 

 

 

CONTENTS AND/OR SUMMARY

Contents : 
  Steps to repair a house after a flood
  Initial safety at my property
  Is it safe to enter my property?
  How can I make water, sewage, electricity and gas supplies safe?
  What can I do to start the clean up and improve safety?
  Homeowner assistance
  How do I replace lost documents?
  How do I make a claim on my house or contents insurance?
  Is there any financial assistance available?
  Clearing your property
  How do I choose someone to clear my property?
  Where can waste material be taken?
  What approvals are needed to demolish or clear?
  Repairing the dwelling
  Licensed contractors
  Do I need a Queensland-licensed builder or contractor?
  How do I find a licensed builder or contractor?
  Building contracts
  What must be included in the building contract?
  Variations to the contract
  Queensland Home Warranty Scheme insurance
  What protection is there against incomplete or defective building work?
  Statutory warranties
  Quick guide to home restoration after a flood
 

LINK 

Click here to go to BSA Homeowner Guide to Rebuilding After a Flood

If the link doesn’t work go to > this link was found via a Google search  


REVIEW #8

TITLE

 Repairing Your House After a Flood. Water Resilient Products and Building Techniques
 

AUTHORITY 

Queensland Government. Department of Infrastructure and Planning.
 

WHAT'S GREAT ABOUT THIS RESOURCE

1. This Fact Sheet has some excellent tips on things to consider when rebuilding – things people might not immediately think of. 
2. Also has a great list of links to reliable, independent authorities for further flood repair information (most of them identified in this review – but not all!)
3. Includes a table that compares water resistant/resilient construction materials side-by-side.  The fact is that many houses are built in areas that will flood once again.  This Fact Sheet suggests materials to consider when rebuilding, to hopefully come out better off (heaven forbid) next time.

 

CONTENTS AND/OR SUMMARY

“This fact sheet provides advice on repairing your home after a flood. It gives you information about the types of building materials and techniques to use during the repair stage to make sure your home is more flood resilient in the future.”

Content areas covered :

Starting your repairs
Repair work should only be undertaken when your house is clean of all mud, silt and debris, and is completely dry.

Water damage
Contact with water can be damaging to some building materials. Depending on the type of building products damage may occur immediately or as a result of prolonged exposure to water...

Water resistant products
There are a number of building products available that have higher water resistance ratings which are cost effective and easy to install.  Some suggested ways of using water resistant products include:...

Product standards
Ensure products and materials used in repairing your home are suitable for their intended use and comply with the relevant product standards...

Other things to consider
There are other things that you can do to make your property more flood resilient, including...

Be aware
Check that tradespeople approaching you for flood repairs are licensed for the work that they intend to undertake....

Useful resources 

LINK 

Click here to go to Repairing Your House After a Flood. Water Resilient Products and Building Techniques

If the link doesn’t work go to http://www.dip.qld.gov.au > Resources > Guidelines > Plumbing & Building > under the heading ‘Flooding’ find the link to the above titled document.



REVIEW #9

TITLE

 Permit Requirements for Rebuilding or Repairing after a Flood
 

AUTHORITY 

Brisbane City Council (BCC)
 

WHAT'S GREAT ABOUT THIS RESOURCE

1. It is acknowledged that this is a Brisbane/Qld –centric resource.  However, the reasoning and logic may shed some light on a ‘typical’ process for such issues and help readers from other States to know what to look for/ask for when seeking information pertaining to their own State or city.
2. This table lists a host of possible repair or rebuild scenarios after a flood event and sets out whether permits might be required to address the situation.  If a permit is required, the list states what type and provides some guidance and discussion on the procedure.

 

CONTENTS AND/OR SUMMARY

The document consists of a table that lists a handful of possible damage-to-house scenarios as a result of a flood, and indicates whether a permit is required to repair or rebuild (as applicable to the Brisbane City Council) regulations. 

NOTE : This document has been in the process of being updated during the course of the preparation of this review.  The new version of the document includes provision for things such as ‘pontoons’, which were not previously included.  Unhelpfully, some scenarios also answer ‘maybe’ to the question of “Is a Permit Required?” !  This document is a work in progress as at February 2011. 

LINK 

Click here to go to Permit Requirements for Rebuilding or Repairing after a Flood

If the link doesn’t work go to http://www.bsadisasterrecovery.qld.gov.au > click on Home and Business Owners > BCC Permit Requirements for Rebuilding or Repairing after a Flood